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AFLCMC directorate awards $330 million contract for C-21 maintenance services

A C-21 passenger jet taxis on the runway to the flightline of the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing at a non-disclosed location in Southwest Asia on May 19. The C-21, according to its Air Force fact sheet, is a twin turbofan engine aircraft used for cargo and passenger airlift. The aircraft is the military version of the Lear Jet 35A business jet. In addition to providing cargo and passenger airlift, the aircraft is capable of transporting one litter or five ambulatory patients during aeromedical evacuations. The C-21 can carry eight passengers and 42 cubic feet (1.26 cubic meters) of cargo.

A C-21 passenger jet taxis on the runway to the flightline of the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing at a non-disclosed location in Southwest Asia on May 19. The C-21, according to its Air Force fact sheet, is a twin turbofan engine aircraft used for cargo and passenger airlift. The aircraft is the military version of the Lear Jet 35A business jet. In addition to providing cargo and passenger airlift, the aircraft is capable of transporting one litter or five ambulatory patients during aeromedical evacuations. The C-21 can carry eight passengers and 42 cubic feet (1.26 cubic meters) of cargo.

The 458th Airlift Squadron houses a C-21 aircraft in Hangar 3, May 18, 2018, at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. The C-21 is primarily used for cargo and passenger airlift, and it can carry up to eight passengers and 42 cubic feet of cargo. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tara Stetler).

The 458th Airlift Squadron houses a C-21 aircraft in Hangar 3, May 18, 2018, at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. The C-21 is primarily used for cargo and passenger airlift, and it can carry up to eight passengers and 42 cubic feet of cargo. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Tara Stetler).

TINKER AIR FORCE BASE, Okla. (AFLCMC) – The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center’s Presidential and Executive Airlift Directorate awarded a ten-year $330 million contract to Akima Logistics Services – a small business – April 16, to provide organizational and depot level maintenance and other support actions required for operating and maintaining the aircraft, aircraft subsystems, and support equipment of the Air Force’s C-21 fleet.

From Sept. 1 through Dec. 31, Akima will complete a transition with the current contractor, reviewing maintenance and supply operations and preparing to take over responsibilities in order to ensure a seamless transition. Akima will then be fully responsible for supporting the C-21 starting Jan. 1, 2021.

Akima’s responsibilities include providing aircraft maintenance services, supply and management of all government owned and contractor owned spares and repairables, launch and recovery of the aircraft at main operating bases and deployment operating locations, as well as mobilizing anywhere in the world to repair and maintain the aircraft, said Matthew Tonay, contracting officer in the directorate.

The C-21 Program Office began acquisition planning and source selection actions early to ensure there was no break in support to the warfighter. 

“Due to efficient and forward thinking, we completed the source selection well in advance of the need for contract award,” said Brig. Gen. Ryan Britton, Program Executive Officer for the Presidential and Executive Airlift Directorate and Source Selection Authority for the C-21 Sustainment Contract.  “Because we were able to finalize the contract award early, the team ultimately saved the taxpayer $18 million in Fiscal Year 2020.”

The C-21 is a twin turbofan-engine aircraft used for passenger and cargo airlift, and medical evacuation missions. It can carry up to eight passengers and 42 cubic feet of cargo.

There are currently 19 aircraft in the Air Force fleet.